3 Reasons pressing “pause” boosts your impact & defines your focus

Posted on by Peter Billingham in Blog Posts, Happiness, Legacy, Public Speaking | 1 Comment

 3 Reasons pressing “pause” boosts your impact & defines your focus

Pause leadership speech Peter Billingham

“It’s not so much knowing when to speak, it’s knowing when to pause,” Jack Benny.

It’s not so much knowing when to push play, it’s knowing when to press pause! Some days I felt like a happy hamster in a comfy cage with a turbo charged wheel. We all need time to pause. You need time to pause. Even when we are ecstatically happy running at full speed, we need to hit the pause button now and then, now … and then. Most of us don’t know we need to pause. I didn’t, but I took a three year pause and it changed the story of my life.

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109 reasons it’s good to expect “The sun will come out tomorrow”

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109 reasons it’s good to expect “The sun will come out tomorrow” – Optimism

Powerful Public Speaking Techniques Peter Billingham
Annie
would say:

The sun’ll come out
Tomorrow
Bet your bottom dollar
That tomorrow
There’ll be sun!

Voltaire takes a different view on the weather forecast:

“Optimism is the madness of insisting that all is well when we are miserable.”

There are days for me when I have the attitude of Annie and other days when the view of Voltaire casts a gloomy shadow and blocks my eyes from the rays of hope that shine brightly on the path ahead. What about you? Read more

How Can You Impact A Fatherless Teenager in 2013?

Posted on by Peter Billingham in Blog Posts, Legacy | 3 Comments

An Epidemic of Fatherless Teenagers

fatherless teenager peterbillingham.comI can remember the day that my dad died.
I was 13.
Being a teenager is tough.
Being a fatherless teenager is tougher.

Attending Sunday School at the Ebenezer Methodist Church was a part of my life from being a little child. The church had been on the same street a short walk from my home since 1833. It was fixture in the local community, everyone in those days knew the “Ebenezer.” Sunday afternoons were spent sitting on uncomfortable wooden pews in front of a flannel chart learning about Noah, Joseph and Jesus by kind hearted ladies who wore feathery hats and smelled of lavender. Each year there was a Sunday School Anniversary where good attendance each week was rewarded with a gift. In 1969, when I was 9 years old, I received the book, “The Boy Who Came Back,” the story of the prodigal son. Read more